Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss

Best selling and critically acclaimed children’s book Green Eggs and Ham, is a staple on kids bookshelves.  According to Publishers Weekly, since Dr. Suess and Random House published the story in 1960, by 2001 it was the fourth best-selling English children’s book of all time.  Recommended by teachers, parents and children across the globe, and one of the most recognizable books in modern culture, despite a temporary ban in China from 1965 to 1991 for its ‘potrayal of early Marxism’.

The creation of the book was largely due to a wager between Theodor Seuss Geisel and his publisher.  Bennett Carf was certain that Dr. Seuss could not compose a story without exceeding 50 words.  Green Eggs and Ham consists of exactly that number: a, am, and, anywhere, are, be, boat, box, car, could, dark, do, eat, eggs, fox, goat, good, green, ham, here, house, I, if, in, let, like, may, me, mouse, not, on, or, rain, Sam, say, see, so, thank, that, the, them, there, they, train, tree, try, will, with, would, you.  Therefore, the book is available as a beginning book for new readers.

The premise follows the rambunctious Sam-I-am as he tries to convince the reluctant, nameless, first person character to try a new dish of the books name sake.  Insisting that the character may enjoy the meal in different settings or with certain company.  After consistent pestering the nameless figure samples the dish, to an astonished delight.

In my final year of culinary training we were given the project to compose and execute a five-course meal, with budget and theme.  I went the route of a children’s theme, specifically food mentioned in the stories by Dr. Seuss.  Green Eggs and Ham was an obvious choice.  I presented a herb-crusted ham accompanied by a fried egg garnished with avocado.  The real life adaptation of this and other fictional meals granted me prefect marks, followed with the Chef using my menu as an example for future classes.

After being blessed with my first born, I quickly began collecting classic children’s stories for his library.  No kids library is complete without installments from Dr. Seuss, and Green Eggs and Ham is essential.  Well, when he reached an age to voice an opinion, the book became a nightly event.  As an adult, after a hundred read-throughs of the repetitive story, I tell you, it gets very annoying.  I am not ashamed to say, I would be happy never to read this story ever again.  Alas, the kids are still young and the book still has its place, I may have another hundred reads to go.

Despite my personal agitation, Green Eggs and Ham is great for young children.  An easy book to read for the beginners, I do recommend it for your kids libraries.  The morals are convenient also, as those dinners when the young ones refuse to try something different, it’s a good example that they may actually enjoy it.

Thanks booknerds, have you read my other posts?  “You do not like them, so you say.  Try them! Try them! And you may.  Try them and you may, I say.”

5 Comments Add yours

  1. Fijay says:

    Dr Seuss is one of my favorites ….GREAT for reading aloud to kids 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Chantale says:

    A childhood favorite, and a book I loved to read to my kids. And like you said, it encourages them to try new foods and new things!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I love Dr. Seuss! I actually do a lesson on teaching via parables and use some of his classic books that explore social justice issues/offer societal critiques. It makes a fun day too when we have the elementary school read-a-long in the high school classroom :).

    Liked by 1 person

  4. this made me smile 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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